Welcome To
Buttonwood
Nature Center
A Natural Evolution of The Institute's Mission

Embark on a journey of discovery at Buttonwood Nature Center, blossoming soon in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. Building on The Institute’s rich heritage, this 40-acre expanse of natural beauty promises a future of learning, exploration, and stewardship.

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Free—registration required
Tuesday, May 28 from 6:30–7:30 p.m.

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Thursdays, June 13–July 25 • 10–11:30 a.m.

Register online today!
Thursday, June 13 from 10–11:30 a.m.

Waynesboro Country Club
Friday, June 28 at 5:30 p.m.

Pine Hill Recreation Area
Monday & Tuesday, July 1 & 2 • 9 am–2 pm

Get ready to S-C-R-A-M-B-L-E
Thursday, July 4 • 7:30 a.m. Start Time

Live from Buttonwood!
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Buttonwood Nature Center friend and SOAR (Studying Ornithology Around the Region) bird walker, Jean McBride submitted the following narrative from the group’s outing on Saturday, May 18 to Conococheague Institute.

Twice-monthly walks, usually led by Larry and Sharon Williams, run on the first and third Saturdays throughout the winter, spring, summer and fall. They run from 8 a.m. to around 10 a.m.

SOAR bird walk locations vary throughout the season. Check our website calendar for locations on specific dates. (www.buttonwoodnaturecenter.org) and tab down under Programs or Events)

Jean photographed her fearless SOAR leaders near a cabin on the property, see attached. The trio spotted a pair of Great Blue Herons soaring overhead. The Great Blue Heron pictured here was photographed by former Buttonwood staff member, Dave Graff, on the Buttonwood property.

The next SOAR walk is Saturday, June 1, at Gettysburg National Battlefield. Meet at the Virginia Monument. All are welcome!

Greetings:

It was raining when we arrived at Conococheague Institute on Saturday May 18, 2024. SOAR leaders, Larry and Sharon Williams, and I happily accepted Director Matthew Wedd’s offer to bird from the back porch of the Visitor Center. He set us up with three sturdy antique wooden chairs and told us about a pair of Great Blue Herons he had seen by the pond.

The porch overlooks a field and woods. Larry had already noted sparrows, catbirds, robins and a mockingbird near the building. From the porch we saw swallows, blackbirds and Larry spotted a flicker poking its head from its nest in a distant tree.

As the rain eased up, we set off for the marshy area. We found wrens and goldfinches around the four-square garden. The Green Frog welcomed us to the pond. Rock Pigeons reliably dotted the roof of the barn. As we approached the wooded area, we looked for the oriole nest we had seen last time. No luck. But we did again see the Red-headed Woodpecker excavating on the side of a snag that also housed a flicker in the topmost hole.

A pair of Great Blue Herons flew directly overhead taking our breath away and making us wish MJ and her camera were there. Having dressed warmly for the weather, we were ready to shed a layer under the roof of the shelter that houses the replica of a dugout canoe. Once outside we spotted a Green Heron flying overhead.

Approaching the bridge, we heard a phoebe, Great-crested Flycatcher and Common Yellow-throat—all eluding our sight. But a brilliant male Baltimore Oriole was visible as it sat atop a tree across the field from the cemetery. Further into the woods we heard the welcome trill of several Wood Thrushes. No thrush sightings, but a pair of Brown Thrashers sat on bare branches long enough for us to see their streaked breasts and long beaks.

Several small birds flew about, but their quick movements, the low light, and the fully leafed out trees foiled identification. We ended our walk with a titmouse, Chipping Sparrows and a Turkey Vulture (Larry’s list of 30 species is below).

Next up is Gettysburg National Battlefield on Saturday June 1, 2024 at 8:00 a.m. Meet at the Virginia Monument.
—Jean

Larry’s list:

American Goldfinch
American Robin
Baltimore Oriole
Barn Swallow
Brown Thrasher
Brown–headed Cowbird
Carolina Wren
Chipping Sparrow
Common Grackle
Common Yellowthroat
Eastern Phoebe
European Starling
Great Blue Heron
Great-crested Flycatcher
Green Heron
Grey Catbird
House Sparrow
House Wren
Mourning Dove
Northern Cardinal
Northern Flicker
Northern Mockingbird
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-winged Blackbird
Rock Pigeon
Song Sparrow
Tufted Titmouse
Turkey Vulture
Wood Thrush
... See MoreSee Less

Buttonwood Nature Center friend and SOAR (Studying Ornithology Around the Region) bird walker, Jean McBride submitted the following narrative from the group’s outing on Saturday, May 18 to Conococheague Institute.

Twice-monthly walks, usually led by Larry and Sharon Williams, run on the first and third Saturdays throughout the winter, spring, summer and fall. They run from 8 a.m. to around 10 a.m.

SOAR bird walk locations vary throughout the season. Check our website calendar for locations on specific dates. (www.buttonwoodnaturecenter.org) and tab down under Programs or Events)

Jean photographed her fearless SOAR leaders near a cabin on the property, see attached. The trio spotted a pair of Great Blue Herons soaring overhead. The Great Blue Heron pictured here was photographed by former Buttonwood staff member, Dave Graff, on the Buttonwood property. 
  
The next SOAR walk is Saturday, June 1, at Gettysburg National Battlefield. Meet at the Virginia Monument. All are welcome! 

Greetings:

It was raining when we arrived at Conococheague Institute on Saturday May 18, 2024.  SOAR leaders, Larry and Sharon Williams, and I happily accepted Director Matthew Wedd’s offer to bird from the back porch of the Visitor Center. He set us up with three sturdy antique wooden chairs and told us about a pair of Great Blue Herons he had seen by the pond. 

The porch overlooks a field and woods. Larry had already noted sparrows, catbirds, robins and a mockingbird near the building. From the porch we saw swallows, blackbirds and Larry spotted a flicker poking its head from its nest in a distant tree.

As the rain eased up, we set off for the marshy area. We found wrens and goldfinches around the four-square garden. The Green Frog welcomed us to the pond. Rock Pigeons reliably dotted the roof of the barn. As we approached the wooded area, we looked for the oriole nest we had seen last time. No luck. But we did again see the Red-headed Woodpecker excavating on the side of a snag that also housed a flicker in the topmost hole. 

A pair of Great Blue Herons flew directly overhead taking our breath away and making us wish MJ and her camera were there. Having dressed warmly for the weather, we were ready to shed a layer under the roof of the shelter that houses the replica of a dugout canoe. Once outside we spotted a Green Heron flying overhead.

Approaching the bridge, we heard a phoebe, Great-crested Flycatcher and Common Yellow-throat—all eluding our sight. But a brilliant male Baltimore Oriole was visible as it sat atop a tree across the field from the cemetery. Further into the woods we heard the welcome trill of several Wood Thrushes. No thrush sightings, but a pair of Brown Thrashers sat on bare branches long enough for us to see their streaked breasts and long beaks. 

Several small birds flew about, but their quick movements, the low light, and the fully leafed out trees foiled identification. We ended our walk with a titmouse, Chipping Sparrows and a Turkey Vulture (Larry’s list of 30 species is below). 

Next up is Gettysburg National Battlefield on Saturday June 1, 2024 at 8:00 a.m. Meet at the Virginia Monument.
                                                            —Jean

Larry’s list:

American Goldfinch
American Robin
Baltimore Oriole
Barn Swallow
Brown Thrasher
Brown–headed Cowbird
Carolina Wren
Chipping Sparrow
Common Grackle
Common Yellowthroat
Eastern Phoebe
European Starling
Great Blue Heron
Great-crested Flycatcher
Green Heron
Grey Catbird
House Sparrow
House Wren
Mourning Dove
Northern Cardinal
Northern Flicker
Northern Mockingbird
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-winged Blackbird
Rock Pigeon
Song Sparrow
Tufted Titmouse
Turkey Vulture
Wood ThrushImage attachment
3 days ago
Buttonwood Nature Center

You may have missed the early crab discount, but it's not too late to register for our biggest fundraiser of the year! 🦀🥂 Visit the link to learn more about our very popular Bay Supper: buttonwoodnaturecenter.org/event/bay-supper-fundraiser/ ... See MoreSee Less

You may have missed the early crab discount, but its not too late to register for our biggest fundraiser of the year! 🦀🥂 Visit the link to learn more about our very popular Bay Supper: https://buttonwoodnaturecenter.org/event/bay-supper-fundraiser/

Earlier this month Geologist Jeri Jones lead a full bus of Rock Hounds on a fun fossil adventure! ⛏👷‍♀️ ... See MoreSee Less

Earlier this month Geologist Jeri Jones lead a full bus of Rock Hounds on a fun fossil adventure! ⛏👷‍♀️Image attachmentImage attachment
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By the Numbers:
Our Impact & Your Role

Each number tells a story of growth, community, and engagement at Buttonwood Nature Center. Become a part of this thriving narrative by joining us as a member and contributing to a legacy of environmental stewardship and education.

0
Annual student visits
0 +
Supporting Members
0
EVENT ATTENDEES SINCE 1990​
0
Years and counting